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Chronic Lateness: How To Overcome it

running-lateIf you’re one of those people who is chronically late, you’ve probably tried and tried to overcome it and have not had much success. The problem with being constantly late is that it starts to affect your job and your life in negative ways. Some people take it very personally when you constantly make them wait because it makes them feel like you place minimal value on them and their time.

If you’re really interested in overcoming your tardiness, the first step is to understand the reason(s) behind your lateness. If you can understand why you’re late, then you can begin to overcome the habit before it really impacts your life in a negative way.

Management consultant, Diana DeLonzor, describes seven types of late people. Most fall into the top three categories:

The Deadliner enjoys the rush of the last minute. She thrives on urgency and often claims to work best under pressure. Sometimes it’s difficult for Deadliners to motivate unless there’s a crisis (even if that means creating crises of their own). Rushing from here to there serves as a way to relieve boredom.

The Producer needs to get as much done in as little time as possible. She feels better about herself when she’s checking things off a massive to-do list. Producers tend to engage in “magical thinking,” consistently underestimating the amount of time their tasks will take. They hate wasting time, so they schedule themselves to make use of every minute of the day.

The Absent-Minded Professor is easily distracted. Distractibility is thought to have a genetic basis and can range from full-blown attention deficit disorder to innocent flakiness. Absent-Minded Professors often lose track of time, misplace car keys and forget appointments.

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9 Responses to Chronic Lateness: How To Overcome it

  1. kim Reply

    February 7, 2013 at 11:02 pm

    This is so me…the absent minded professor….always late…never on time…get side tacked…the funny thing I am never ever late doing the things that I love to do or late for the places that I want to be at!

  2. T. Ealy. Reply

    February 8, 2013 at 7:44 am

    One thing that wasn’t mentioned is work place abuse. Most people dread going to work and this is significant in being on time. I always here about domestic violence in the home but they never talk about workplace abuse, which I experienced during the majority of my working career.

  3. Ruby from NJ Reply

    February 8, 2013 at 9:58 am

    I have an always-late friend who drives me crazy. I have pulled her chestnuts out of the fire dozens of times. She is slow about everything. She would be late for work, and I would cover for her. Once, we had an important meeting to attend at six-thirty p.m. She arrived at my house at six-thirty p.m., making me late, too! When we attended a conference, the speaker was already talking when she arrived. I was too embarrassed to look up. I honestly believe there is something wrong with her.

  4. Cindie Reply

    February 8, 2013 at 3:05 pm

    As T. Early stated, workplace bullying is quite common. In fact there is an organization that proides education and support to the victims of workplace bullying.

  5. barbara Reply

    February 11, 2013 at 1:22 am

    This is a nice way to analyse chronic lateness. Are there only 3 categories? Did a social scientist determine these 3 categories.

    Its unfortunate that I am a producer & absentminded professor.

    I wish there was a cure. I have been this way since my teenager years. It seems now when I analyze why I am running late I am trying to accomplish too many things.

  6. Camille Reply

    February 18, 2013 at 1:38 pm

    There’s another factor here. Chronic lateness is a kind of passive-aggressive rejection of authority. You don’t show up on time because nobody can make you do it. In the back of your mind, you’re showing your home room teacher who’s *really* boss. You’re giving priority to your own perceived needs as opposed to the needs of the people who are waiting for you.

  7. Camille Reply

    February 18, 2013 at 1:39 pm

    There’s another factor here. Chronic lateness is a kind of passive-aggressive rejection of authority. You don’t show up on time because nobody can make you do it. In the back of your mind, you’re showing your home room teacher who’s *really* boss. You’re giving priority to your own perceived needs as opposed to the needs of the people who are waiting for you.

  8. Camille Reply

    February 18, 2013 at 1:39 pm

    There’s another factor here. Chronic lateness is a kind of passive-aggressive rejection of authority. You don’t show up on time because nobody can make you do it. In the back of your mind, you’re showing your home room teacher who’s *really* boss. You’re giving priority to your own perceived needs as opposed to the needs of the people who are waiting for you.

  9. Florence Reply

    March 13, 2013 at 2:20 pm

    I’m also the absent minded professor. I am always late to every thing, no matter how I try not to be; something happens. The phone rings or somebody shows up at the door, it’s always something. I for get something or I’m trying to clean up before I leave. I have been this way most of my life. I’m retired now. I make my appointments late ln the day so I can try an get their on time. I hated when I’m late myself. But I just can’t seem to get pass it.

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