New Study Says Having a Big “behind” Can Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes & Heart Disease

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serena catsuitWe’ve all heard of the many different body types and shapes. Most of the time, they are discussed, in magazines and day time talk shows, for the purpose of fashion and bathing suites, so as to decide what looks best on each body shape.

It turns out your body type and shape can tell your more than just what type of outfit you should wear to look your best, it ca also tell you a lot about your health.

A new study says that you can learn a lot about your health from your body shape and it also dispels some long held beliefs and myths about the different body types.

The study conducted by researchers at UC Davis and published by the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism online January 10th, refutes the previously held belief that people with “pear-shaped” bodies (with fat concentrated in their hips, thighs and bu++) were at less risk for medical conditions like heart disease and diabetes than people with “apple-shaped” bodies (with fat concentrated in the body’s mid-region).

The researchers found that fat concentrated in the bu++ may increase a person’s chances of developing metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome refers to a group of factors — including a larger waistline, high blood pressure and lower “good” cholesterol — all of which can increase one’s risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. “Our research helps to dispel the myth that gluteal fat is ‘innocent,” said Ishwarlal Jialal, lead author of the study and a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, and of internal medicine at UC Davis, in a press release.

The researchers looked at a group of 45 patients with early metabolic syndrome and compared them with a control group of 30 people, matching the two for age and gender. They found that fat in your posterior raised the level of the protein chemerin — which is associated with high blood pressure and low “good” cholesterol — in those with early metabolic syndrome.

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12 Comments

  1. Well this is one study to refute quite a few that says something different. I wonder if the people they studied also had large fat deposits in their stomach.
    The other problem is though they are talking about you people with gluteal fat deposits the picture shows they (writer of this article) can’t distinguish between gluteal muscle and literal fat.

  2. Daphne Miller on

    This is some bull. They did a study with 45 people? Lol. What was the family medical history of this 45 people.

  3. The person you chose to highlight the so called problem is the best tennis player on the planet and the most physically attractive of any tennis player I have seen in 50 years.
    God gave Serena and most Black women what he did not give the others. The media has tried to make our gifts a negative and some people buy this nonsense. I don’t

  4. I have to ask the same question: was stomach fat also a factor? And, yes, we know the difference between fat and muscle so don’t try to mislead us with a pic of Serena. This is not to deny that there are obese individuals but to make blanket statements with a possible ulterior agenda, has to be questioned!

  5. Veronica Judy Dixon on

    WHOEVER DID THIS STUDY NEEDS TO FIND A SWORD N FALL ON IT. I GOT A BIG BUTT AND AIn't NEVER HAD NONE OF THIS MESS, ITS ABOUT UR DIET.. FIRST U MESS UP BLACK FOLKS BY NOT HAVIN A PROPER BMI FOR US ( ITS SAYS IM SUPPOSED TO BE 140 GTFOH) BUT NOW BIG BUTTS ARE UNHEALTHY? WELL KISS MY ASS.

  6. I would think one's diet would determine this more than their shape and why would they have Serena in this article. Her butt is NOT fat, that is muscle…smh.

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