Study: Single Black Women Rarely Date Outside Their Race

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By Victor Trammell

Photo credits: Getty Images

The Pew Research Center recently released a report, which derived from a study about how the public still views interracial marriage.

Gretchen Livingston and  are the authors of the new Pew Research Center study, which is titled “Intermarriage in the U.S. 50 Years After Loving vs. Virginia.” Livingston and Brown are both Senior Researchers at the Pew Center.

In their published May 2017 report, Livingston and Brown stated that today, nearly 20 percent of all America’s newlywed couples are interracial ones. However, according to the substantive survey data, black women are much less likely than black men to marry or date outside of their race.

“Among blacks, intermarriage is twice as prevalent for male newlyweds as it is for their female counterparts,” Livingston and Brown wrote in their report on the new Pew Center study.

“While about one-fourth of recently married black men (24%) have a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, this share is 12% among recently married black women,” Livingston and Brown continued.

The Pew Research Center’s study findings also indicated that formally educated people are usually more receptive to interracial dating and marriage than people who are not formally educated.

“In 2015, 14% of newlyweds with a high school diploma or less were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity, compared with 18% of those with some college and 19% of those with a bachelor’s degree or more,” the report also reads.

When it comes to black newlyweds, the gender gap over interracial dating and marriage sharply increases when it comes to education level.

“For those with a high school diploma or less, 17% of men vs. 10% of women are intermarried, while among those with a bachelor’s degree, black men are more than twice as likely as black women to intermarry (30% vs. 13%),” the report shows.

The differentiation between black men and black women’s views on interracial dating and marriage was not theorized in the study’s summation. However, societal issues that influence self-esteem and the perception of the availability of the opposite sex may have much to do with this major gender difference as it pertains to blacks.

Source: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2017/05/18/intermarriage-in-the-u-s-50-years-after-loving-v-virginia/

 

 

 

 

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